Main Publications

Latest Main Publications

  • The Struggle Far From Home: Yemeni Refugees in Cairo 

    Since 2015, the devastating conflict in Yemen has created a debilitating economic and humanitarian crisis and displaced millions of Yemenis. While the vast majority of displaced Yemenis remain within Yemen — around 3.65 million — Yemenis who do seek safety abroad most often flee to countries across the Arab world, including Egypt, Sudan, Djibouti and Jordan, as well as to Malaysia. Read more...
  • Yemen’s Accelerating Economic Woes During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    This paper presents policy recommendations to address this situation for the United Nations and other international stakeholders, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states, as well as the internationally recognized Yemeni government and the de facto authorities in Sana’a (the armed Houthi movement, Ansar Allah). Read more...
  • Improving Marib Authorities’ Skills, Capacities to Meet IDP Influx

    By Saad Hizam Ali Introduction With the Yemen war in its sixth year, the situation of public institutions in each governorate has changed in various ways. Marib governorate has become a destination for tens of thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) at a time from other areas, with the increase in population impacting the provision… Read more...
  • Economic Priorities for a Sustainable Peace Agreement in Yemen

    The sustainability of a peace agreement in Yemen depends on two critical economic issues. First, in a conflict that is largely over access to resources, the issues of distribution, control, and sharing of those resources can make or break peace. Read more...
  • Microfinance in Yemen: An Overview of Challenges and Opportunities

    The formally regulated microfinance industry, given its stronger institutional framework and governance, has garnered a relatively more advantageous environment to develop capacities and strategies to react to local demand, making it more resilient to shocks and adverse events, such as the ongoing conflict. Read more...
  • Developing Yemen’s Fishing Industry

    The fishing industry in Yemen faces many structural challenges that have limited its production and potential contribution to overall economic output. Development of the industry’s infrastructure, human capacity and regulation was already poor prior to the outbreak of the ongoing armed conflict in Yemen. Read more...
  • Developing Human Capital

    As part of the “Rethinking Yemen’s Economy” initiative, a group of education and healthcare specialists, private sector actors, and civil servants, including representatives of the Development Champions, convened in Amman, Jordan, on August 24-25, 2019, for a workshop on Yemen’s human capital. This policy brief presents some of Yemen’s human capital indicators before and during the current conflict, while highlighting some of the obstacles to gathering required statistical data. It also presents recommendations to strengthen human capital in Yemen at… Read more...
  • The Yemen Syllabus

    Prepared by Sana’a Center for Strategic Studies This document aims to guide readers toward substantive and important publications related to Yemen. Section A includes suggestions on how to get accurate and up-to-date information on the country. Section B lists academics and analysts who have written on Yemen. Section C outlines what the Sana’a Center views… Read more...
  • A Gendered Crisis: Understanding the Experiences of Yemen’s War

    Few Yemenis have been spared the catastrophic impact of the Yemen War, but prevailing gender norms mean women and girls, and men and boys, have experienced the conflict differently. This report explores how gender norms have shaped Yemenis’ experience of conflict, and how conflict is reshaping gender norms in Yemen. Read more...
  • Restructuring Public Finances in Yemen

    Even before the current conflict, Yemen’s public finances suffered from an overdependence on energy exports, one of the lowest tax collection rates in the world, and chronic budget and balance of payments deficits. The government’s consistent operating deficits were funded through domestic debt instruments – drawing investment away from the private sector – borrowing from its own central bank, and foreign loans. Read more...
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